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  • 2015 November 20: All Glory, Laud and Honor

    November 20, 2016 10:30

    The original Latin words to “All Glory, Laud and Honor" were written by Theodulph of Orleans (760-821). Theodulph was born into the Ital­i­an no­bil­i­ty, but de­cid­ed on a life of re­li­gious ser­vice. His first po­si­tion was as ab­bot of a mon­as­te­ry in Fi­ren­ze (Flor­ence), Ita­ly. In 781, Char­le­magne ap­point­ed him Bi­shop of Or­leans, France. How­ev­er, his flour­ish­ing ca­reer came to an abrupt end with Char­le­magne’s death. Lou­is the Pi­ous sus­pect­ed The­o­dulph of se­cret loy­al­ty to po­li­ti­cal lead­ers in It­a­ly, the coun­try of his birth. These sus­pi­cions led to The­o­dulph’s im­pris­on­ment in An­giers in 818. It was there he wrote “All Glo­ry, Laud and Hon­or”, and later perished. (more )

  • 2016 November 27: Greensleeves

    November 19, 2016 08:39

    Greensleeves is traditionally ascribed to King Henry VIII. However, the piece is based on an Italian style of composition that did not reach England until after Henry’s death, making it more likely Elizabethan in origin. In Shakespeare’s The Merry Wives of Windsor (written, c.1597; first published in 1602), the character Mistress Ford refers twice to "the tune of ’Greensleeves’", and Falstaff later exclaims: “Let the sky rain potatoes! Let it thunder to the tune of ‘Greensleeves’!”

  • 2016 November 13: Washington Gladden

    November 13, 2016 10:30

    William Gladden (1836-1918) — so named because his great-grandfather served as George Washington's bodyguard during the Revolutionary War — was a Congregational pastor. He served in New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio during the post-Civil War industrial era when racial and economic injustice was rampant. People everywhere were searching for a new American ethic. (more )

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