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  • 2016 November 27: Greensleeves

    November 19, 2016 08:39

    Greensleeves is traditionally ascribed to King Henry VIII. However, the piece is based on an Italian style of composition that did not reach England until after Henry’s death, making it more likely Elizabethan in origin. In Shakespeare’s The Merry Wives of Windsor (written, c.1597; first published in 1602), the character Mistress Ford refers twice to "the tune of ’Greensleeves’", and Falstaff later exclaims: “Let the sky rain potatoes! Let it thunder to the tune of ‘Greensleeves’!”

  • 2014 September 21: Isaac Watts

    November 06, 2016 10:30

    Isaac Watts (1674–1748) was an English logician, Christian theologian, and the author of some 750 hymn texts, including "O God, Our Help in Ages Past". Watts was brought up in the home of a committed religious Nonconformist; his father, also Isaac Watts, was imprisoned twice for his views. Watts received a classical education, learning Latin, Greek and Hebrew. (more )

  • 2016 September 11: Gymnopedie

    September 11, 2016 10:30

    Erik Satie was a French pianist and composer during the Impressionist period (early 20th century). After his mother's death when Satie was 6, he and his younger brother were sent to live with his grandparents. There he received his first music lessons from a local organist. When he was 12 his grandmother died, and the two brothers were reunited in Paris with their father, who married a piano teacher shortly afterwards. From the early 1880s onwards, Satie started publishing salon compositions by his step-mother and himself, among others. (more )

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